Commercial Litigation UK

  • April 16, 2024

    Womble Bond Sued Over Advice On £126M Real Estate Project

    Two businessmen and a management company have sued Womble Bond Dickinson (UK) LLP in a London court after the law firm's allegedly negligent advice caused a £126 million ($157 million) property redevelopment project to fall through.

  • April 16, 2024

    Cigna Denies Insurer's Claim For PPI Complaints Indemnity

    Cigna hit back at insurer PA (GI) Ltd.'s claim to recover its costs of dealing with missold payment protection insurance for healthcare cover, saying that it is not entitled to any compensation.

  • April 16, 2024

    Hill Dickinson Bolsters Disputes Team With New Partner

    Hill Dickinson LLP has snapped up a partner from Teacher Stern LLP to join its commercial litigation team, bringing a wealth of dispute resolution and crisis management experience to the table.

  • April 16, 2024

    Charity Pushed Out Exec But Not Over Whistleblowing

    A charity unlawfully pushed its former head of governance out of the organization by treating her unfairly, but not because she voiced concerns that a property sale might violate industry regulations, an employment tribunal ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pornhub Owner Makes Fresh Bid To Nix Dish's Patents

    Adult entertainment outfit Pornhub's parent company Aylo has hit U.S. satellite television network Dish with a claim to revoke two of the network's U.K. patents, the latest volley in the international streaming technology patent dispute between the two companies.

  • April 16, 2024

    Amazon Staffer Wins Payout Over Early-Morning Health Check

    Amazon must pay its former employee £1,600 ($1,990) after it failed to accommodate his anxiety by demanding that he attend an early-morning occupational health appointment, a Scottish tribunal has ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    Legal Experts Uneasy About Post Office Convictions Law

    Legal experts warned a parliamentary committee Tuesday that government plans to introduce legislation to quash the convictions of hundreds of Post Office branch managers could unintentionally set a precedent for other miscarriages of justice. 

  • April 16, 2024

    7,000 Asda Staff Lose Full Disclosure Bid In Equal Pay Case

    A tribunal ruled Tuesday that 7,000 Asda workers whose equal pay claims are stayed pending a lead group action cannot have access to all other claimants' correspondence with the supermarket ahead of the upcoming first battle.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Says Lawyers Ignored Prosecution Risks

    The Post Office's former chief executive said Tuesday that he was "surprised" that in-house lawyers who prosecuted sub-postmasters based on faulty IT data ignored the risk of failing to disclose certain key facts in court.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Airport Train Staffers Get Early Win In Travel Discount Case

    Former employees of London's Heathrow Express airport train won an appeal Tuesday that they were wrongly barred from a cheap travel benefit after they opted for redundancy — but a new tribunal will decide whether their breach of contract claims can continue.

  • April 16, 2024

    Semiconductor Maker Accuses Intel Of Infringing Chip Patent

    Semiconductor maker R2 told a London court Tuesday that major tech rival Intel has infringed its computer chip technology, arguing that it has a valid patent over a technology that allows computer processors to avoid voltage spikes.

  • April 16, 2024

    Law Firm Denies Encouraging Consultant's Weak Case

    Costigan King has denied owing a consultant £291,000 ($362,000) for allegedly advising he fight a claim to stop him providing legal services, saying that it never told him he had a strong case.

  • April 16, 2024

    Bakery Chases Insurers In Multimillion Fire Damage Claim

    A bakery has sued six insurers for at least £26 million ($33.4 million) over claims they wrongfully refused to cover damage and business interruption losses caused by a fire at one of its bakery sites.

  • April 16, 2024

    Insurance Manager Harassed By Bosses Wins £56K

    A tribunal has ordered a British insurance broker to pay a former manager more than £56,000 ($69,800) after ruling that the business pushed her out because bosses no longer valued her after she went off sick with anxiety and depression.

  • April 16, 2024

    Lawyers Call For Rethink Of Personal Injury 'Discount Rate'

    The government must radically rethink the way compensation for major personal injury claims is calculated or else risk continually under-compensating claimants, a legal industry trade body warned.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    AGA Accused Of Trying To 'Control' Aftermarket With IP Claim

    A company that makes and fits electronic conversion kits for AGA Cookers has told a London court that the high-end oven maker's copyright and trademark claim is just a bid to control aftermarket sales for its units.

  • April 15, 2024

    Naftogaz Urges Court To Uphold $5B Award Against Russia

    Ukraine's state-owned oil company has hit back at Russia's bid in D.C. federal court to toss its attempt to enforce a $5 billion arbitral award it won after its Crimean assets were seized following Russia's annexation of the peninsula, saying the court has jurisdiction over the case.

  • April 15, 2024

    Real Estate Plans Were £50M Ponzi Scheme, Investors Say

    Over 400 real estate investors said two British men ran a U.K.-wide fraud akin to a Ponzi scheme at a London trial of their £50 million ($62.3 million) claim Monday, arguing the men had made false promises about the returns the investments would generate.

  • April 15, 2024

    Broker Hit With £15M Claim Over Mexican Reinsurance Policies

    A Mexican reinsurance broker and one of its clients are suing a London-based broker for more than £14.8 million ($18.4 million), claiming that one of the U.K. company's agents faked documents for nonexistent reinsurance arrangements and pocketed the proceeds.

  • April 15, 2024

    Rastafarian Ex-Army Band Player Wins Race Bias Case

    A former British Army horn player has won his racial discrimination case against the Ministry of Defence, with a tribunal concluding that officers stereotyped him as an "angry Black man" and dismissed his complaints about racist treatment.

  • April 15, 2024

    No Quid Pro Quo In Thank You Posts, Fired Journalist Says

    A sports journalist fired after publicly thanking a company that was a corporate sponsor of his charity fundraising efforts argued to an employment tribunal Monday that there was "no quid pro quo" that compromised the BBC.

  • April 15, 2024

    SRA Accuses Lawyer Of Profiting From Client Loans

    A solicitor profited from his clients' financial difficulties by convincing them to enter into financial arrangements for his benefit, the Solicitors Regulation Authority told a tribunal Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prison Governor Loses Claim He Was Excluded From Union

    A prison governor lost his claim against a trade union that refused to let him join its ranks twice because he had held key positions in another union that competed with it, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prince Harry Ordered To Pay Gov't Costs In Security Case

    A London judge has ordered Prince Harry to pay 90% of the government's legal costs and refused him permission to appeal after he lost his challenge to its decision to downgrade his taxpayer-funded security when he quit his royal duties.

Expert Analysis

  • Clarifying Legal Elements To Support A Genocide Claim At ICJ

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    Reporting on South Africa’s dispute against Israel in the International Court of Justice largely fails to clearly articulate what a case for genocide alleged in the context of war requires — a technical analysis that will evaluate several key factors, from the scale of the devastation to statements by officials, say Solomon Shinerock and Alex Bedrosyan at Lewis Baach.

  • Opinion

    Employment Tribunal Fees Risk Reducing Access To Justice

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    Before the proposed fee regime for employment tribunal claims can take effect, the government needs much more evidence that low-income individuals — arguably the tribunal system's most important users — will not be negatively affected by the fees, says Max Winthrop, employment law committee chair at the Law Society.

  • Tribunal Cases Illustrate Balancing Act Of Anti-Bias Protection

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    Recent employment tribunal discrimination cases show employers the complexities of determining the scope of protected characteristics under the Equality Act, and responding proportionately, particularly when conflicts involve controversial beliefs that can trigger competing employee discrimination claims, say Michael Powner and Sophie Rothwell at Charles Russell.

  • EU Ruling Exposes Sovereignty Fissures In Int'l Arbitration

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    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling that the U.K. had breached EU law by allowing an arbitral award to proceed underscores the diminished influence of EU jurisprudence in the U.K., hinting at the EU courts' increasingly nominal sway in international arbitration within jurisdictions that prize legal autonomy, says Josep Galvez at 4-5 Gray’s Inn.

  • UK Arbitration Ruling Offers Tips On Quelling Bias Concerns

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    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W to remove an arbitrator because of impartiality concerns offers several lessons on mitigating bias, including striking a balance between arbitration experience and knowledge of a particular industry, and highlights the importance of careful arbitrator appointment, says Paul-Raphael Shehadeh at Duane Morris.

  • UK Amazon Ruling Spotlights TM Rights In International Sales

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    Highlighting the conflict between the territorial nature of trademark rights and the borderless nature of the internet, the U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision — that Amazon's U.S. website could infringe EU and U.K. rights by targeting local buyers — offers guidance on navigating trademark rights in relation to online sales, say Emmy Hunt, Mark Kramer and Jordan Mitchell at Potter Clarkson.

  • UK Courts Continue To Struggle With Crypto-Asset Cases

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    Although the common law has proved capable of applying established principles to crypto-assets, recent cases highlight persistent challenges in identifying defendants, locating assets and determining jurisdiction, suggesting that any meaningful development will likely come from legislative or regulatory change, say Emily Saunderson and Sam Mitchell at Quadrant Chambers.

  • Why Computer Evidence Is Not Always Reliable In Court

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    Recent challenges to the admissibility of encrypted communication from the messaging tool EncroChat highlight the flawed presumption in the U.K. common law framework that computer evidence is always accurate, and why a nuanced assessment of such evidence is needed, say Sam De Silva and Josie Welland at CMS Legal.

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

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    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

  • Bias Ruling Offers Guidance On Disqualifying Arbitrators

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    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W, removing an arbitrator due to bias concerns, reaffirms practical considerations when assessing an arbitrator's impartiality, and highlights how ill-chosen language by an arbitrator can clear the high bar for disqualification, say Andrew Connelly and Ian Meredith at K&L Gates.

  • Employer Lessons From Ruling On Prof's Anti-Zionist Views

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    In Miller v. University of Bristol, an employment tribunal recently ruled that a professor's anti-Zionist beliefs were protected by the Equality Act 2010, highlighting for employers why it’s important to carefully consider disciplinary actions related to an employee's political expressions, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • Design Rights Can Build IP Protection, EU Lego Ruling Shows

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    The EU General Court's recent ruling in Delta Sport v. EU Intellectual Property Office — that Lego's registered community design for a building block was valid — helps clarify when technically dictated designs can enjoy IP protection, and demonstrates how companies can strategically use design rights to protect and enhance their market position, says Christoph Moeller at Mewburn Ellis.

  • ECJ Ruling Clarifies Lawyer Independence Questions

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    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling in Bonnanwalt v. EU Intellectual Property Office, finding that a law firm had maintained independence despite being owned by its client, serves as a pivotal reference point to understanding the contours of legal representation before EU courts, say James Tumbridge and Benedict Sharrock-Harris at Venner Shipley.

  • Unpacking The Law Commission's Digital Assets Consultation

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    The Law Commission recently published a consultation on recognizing a third personal property category to accommodate the development of digital assets, highlighting difficulties with current models of property rights and the potential consequences of considering digital assets as personal property, say Andrew Tsang and Tom Bacon at BCLP.

  • 1st Appellate Ruling On Digital Terms Sets Tone For Disputes

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    The Court of Appeal's recent ruling in Parker-Grennan v. Camelot, the first appellate decision to consider how online terms and conditions are publicized, provides, in its tone and verdict on incorporation, an invaluable guide for how to approach similar disputes in the digital space, says Eddy Eccles at Covington.

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